References & resources

References from the “Healing Through Knowing Our History” presentation at the International Korean Adoptee Association (IKAA) Gathering August 1, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea

Bibliography:

  • For copyright reasons, please use articles for personal reason only.
  • Many of these articles can be found on the Sutori website, linked at the bottom of the page.
  • For un-linked articles, we hope we have provided enough information for you to find them online on your own.

Cavicchi, Andrea Kim.  “Power, Resistance, and Subjectivity: An Exploration of Overseas Korean Adoptees in Korea.”  PhD diss., University of California, Los Angeles, 2016.  

Chang, Paul Y. and Andrea Kim Cavicchi.  “Claiming Rights: Organizational and Discursive Strategies of the Korean Adoptee and Unwed Mother Movement.”  Korea Observer, Vol. 46, No. 1 (Spring 2105): 145-180.

Choe Sang-Hun.  “Group Resists Korean Stigma for Unwed Mothers.”  New York Times, October 7, 2009.

Choe Sang-Hun.  “An Adoptee Returns to South Korea and Changes Follow.”  New York Times,  June 28, 2013.

Choy, Catherine Ceniza, “Race and Rescue in Early Asian International Adoption History.”  Chap. 1 in Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America.  New York: New York University Press, 2013.  

—.  “Institutionalizing International Adoption: The Historical Origins of Korean Adoption in the United States.” Chap. 2 in  In International Korean Adoption: A Fifty-Year History of Policy and Practice. Edited by Kathleen Ja Sook Bergquist, M. Elizabeth Vonk, Dong Soo Kim, and Marvin D. Feit.   New York: Routledge, 2007.

Cumings, Bruce, “Collision.” Chap.5 in Korea’s Place in the Sun: A Modern History.  New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2005.

Hübinette, Tobias, “Kim Dae Jung and the Adoption Issue.” Chap. 3 in Comforting an Orphaned Nation: Representations of International Adoption and Adopted Koreans in Korean Popular Culture. Seoul: Jimoondang, 2006. Rpt. as The Korean Adoption Issue between Modernity and Coloniality: Transnational Adoption and Overseas Adoptees in Korean Popular Culture. Sarrbrücken: Lambert Academic, 2009. Print.

—.  “Korean Adoption History” in Community 2004. Guide to Korea for Overseas Adopted Koreans. Overseas Koreans Foundation, 2004.

Jones, Maggie.  “The Returned: Why a Generation of Adoptees is Returning to South Korea.” New York Times, January 14, 2015.

Kim, Dong Soo,  “A Country Divided: Contextualizing Adoption from a Korean Perspective.” Chap. 1 in  In International Korean Adoption: A Fifty-Year History of Policy and Practice. Edited by Kathleen Ja Sook Bergquist, M. Elizabeth Vonk, Dong Soo Kim, and Marvin D. Feit.   New York: Routledge, 2007.  

Kim, Elaine and Eui-Young Yu, eds. “Brief Overview of Korean and Korean American History.”  Appendix C in East to America: Korean American Life Stories.  New York: New Press 1997

Kim, Elena J., “Waifs’ and ‘Orphans’ The Origins of Korean Adoption.” Chap. 1 in Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politic of Belonging. Duke University Press, 2010.

—. “Made in Korea: Adopted Koreans and Native Koreans in the Motherland.” Chap. 6 in Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politic of Belonging. Duke University Press, 2010.

—. The Origins of Korean Adoption: Cold War Geopolitics and Intimate Diplomacy. Working Paper Series (WP 09-09). U. S.-Korea Institute at SAIS, Johns Hopkins. 2009. Web. 24 Aug. 2012.

Kim, Hosu, “Secure the Nation, Secure the Family.” Chap. 2 in Birth Mothers and Transnational Adoption Practice in South Korea: Virtual Mothering.  New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016.

Kim, Kihwan. “The 1997-98 Korean Financial Crisis: Causes, Policy Response and Lessons.”     Presentation at The High-Level Seminar on Crisis Prevention in Emerging Markets, International Monetary Fund and the Government of Singapore, Singapore, July 10-11, 2006.

Kim, Michael. 2016. “The Politics of Officially Recognizing Religions and the Expansion of Urban ‘’Social Work’’ in Colonial Korea.”  Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 7 No. 2 (October 2016): 69-98.

Kim, Seung-kyung, “Women Caught Between Global Capitalism and South Korean Patriarchy.” Chap. 1 in Class Struggle or Family Struggle: The Lives of Women Factory Workers in South Korea.  Cambridge University Press, 1997.

—.  “The Myth of Social Mobility: Its Creation and Reproduction Among Workers.” Chap. 3 in Class Struggle or Family Struggle: The Lives of Women Factory Workers in South Korea.  Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Koo, Hagen, “Industrial Transformation.” Chap. 2 in Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation.  Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.

—.  “A Martyr, Women Workers, and Churches.” Chap. 4 in Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation.  Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2001.

Lee, Dayoon.  “The evolution of family policy in South Korea: From Confucian familism to Neo-familism.”  Asian Social Work and Policy Review, Vol. 12, Issue 1 (February. 2018): 46-53.

Lee, Na Young.  “The Construction of U.S. Camptown Prostitution in South Korea: Trans/formation and Resistance.”  PhD diss., University of Maryland, College Park, 2006.

Min, Pyong Gap. “Korean ‘Comfort Women’: The Intersection of Colonial Power, Gender, and Class.”  Gender and Society, Vol. 17 No. 6 (December 2003): 938-957. 

Moon, Katharine H.S.  “Partners in Prostitution.” Chap. 1 in Sex Among Allies: Military Prostitution in U.S.-Korea Relations.  New York: Columbia University Press, 1997. 

Moon, Seungsook.  “Marginalized in Production and Mobilized to be Domestic: Women’s Incorporation into the Nation.” Chap. 3 in Militarized Modernity and Gendered Citizenship in South Korea.  Duke University Press, 2005.

National Association of Black Social Workers.  “Position Statement on Trans-racial Adoptions.” 1972. 

National Indian Child Welfare Association.  “Setting the Record Straight: The Indian Child Welfare Act Fact Sheet.”  September 2015.

Oh, Arissa, “GIs and Missionaries in the Land of Orphans.” Chap. 1 in To Save the Children of Korea: The Cold War Origins of International Adoption.  Stanford University Press, 2015.

—. “Solving the GI Baby Problem.” Chap. 2 in To Save the Children of Korea: The Cold War Origins of International Adoption.  Stanford University Press, 2015.

—. “International Adoption in the ‘Miracle on the Han.’” Chap. 6 in  To Save the Children of Korea: The Cold War Origins of International Adoption.  Stanford University Press, 2015.  

Pate, Soojin, “Militarized Humanitarianism: Rethinking the Emergency of Korean Adoption.” Chap. 1 in  From Orphan to Adoptee: US Empire and Genealogies of Korean Adoption. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

Rothschild, Matthew.  “Babies for Sale: South Koreans make them, Americans buy them.”  The Progressive (January 1988): 18-23. 

Tschida, Rachel Kim.  “Unwed Mothers Experience Limited Reproductive Choices in South Korea.”  Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, 2016. 

Other references:

  • Sutori website with more articles (some duplicated from above). For personal interest and use only, please)
  • Deann Borshay Liem’s Mu Films

Recommended books:

  • International Korean Adoption: A Fifty-Year History of Policy and Practice, edited by Kathleen Ja Sook Bergquist, M. Elizabeth Yonk, Dong Soo Kim, and Marvin D. Feit
  • Comforting an Orphaned Nation: Representations of International Adoption and Adopted Koreans in Korean Popular Culture, by Tobias Hubinette
  • Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politics of Belonging, by Eleana Kim
  • Invisible Asians: Korean American Adoptees. Asian American Experiences. And Racial Exceptionalism, by Kim Park Nelson.